5 Cosy Cabins for a BC Getaway

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While many people think of summer as cabin season in BC, a hideaway in the woods is attractive any time of year. When you need to bundle up to go outdoors, holing up in a cosy cabin with nothing to do except read or chat by the fire with a glass of wine or a steaming hot chocolate can be very appealing.

Even a rustic cabin can feel luxurious when reached after a long hike. Whether you’re up for a hearty outdoor adventure or just a stroll along a windswept beach, chilly weather makes the hunkering down afterwards that much sweeter.

Here are 5 options for a snug cabin retreat in BC, ranging from basic warm shelter (that’s free!) to a pampering retreat.

Tin Hat Cabin, Sunshine Coast Trail

A log cabin sits on top of a mountain, overlooking the ocean.

Tin Hat Cabin provides creature comforts after a long hike on the Sunshine Coast Trail. Photo: @billharding via Instagram

Located at the halfway point of the Sunshine Coast Trail, this hut is worth the multi-day hike. The fully winterized cabin has a pellet stove that keeps things cosy. It sleeps 10 hikers on a shared basis.

The Sunshine Coast Trail is a 180-kilometre (112-mile) backcountry experience that stretches from Sarah Point in Desolation Sound to Saltery Bay south of Powell River. It’s the longest hut-to-hut hiking experience in Canada (and the only free one). There are currently 13 huts on the route.

Elizabeth Parker Hut, Yoho National Park

A log cabin is nestled within a snow capped mountain range.

Depending on the weather, you can hike or snowshoe to Elizabeth Parker Hut in Yoho National Park. Photo: @hannahkeiver via Instagram.

Located near Lake O’Hara in Yoho National Park, this historic backcountry hut is run by the Alpine Club of Canada. It’s named after Elizabeth Parker, who was one of the founders of the Alpine Club of Canada in 1906.

The rustic cabin is available for rentals year round and sleeps 20 in the winter and 24 in the summer. While there are cooking facilities, you must bring your own food and sleeping bags. Head there prepared: in shoulder season, it’s a three- to four-hour hike, ski, or snowshoe from the Lake O’Hara Trailhead; see the Alpine Club of Canada for more information.

Ocean Village Resort, Tofino

A brightly lit lodge sits under a star-filled sky.

Your dog can enjoy the starry nights with you at Ocean Village Resort in Tofino. Photo: @bennnnnnnngie via Instagram

Tofino is famous for storm watching, and a cosy place to do it is from a “beehive” cabin at Ocean Village Resort on MacKenzie Beach. These family-friendly cabins come in a variety of sizes from studios to two bedrooms. An indoor 50-foot (15-metre) heated saltwater pool (and a hot tub) on the property helps to keep the kids occupied in all weather.

This is a good place to bring your dog since the property is pet friendly. Dogs may run freely on the beach, so Fido can revel in the oceanfront location as much as you.

Point-No-Point Resort, near Sooke

A woman relaxes in an outdoor hot tub with views of the ocean.

Hot tubs on the deck with an ocean view add to the appeal of Point-No-Point Resort near Sooke. Photo: @meaganamy via Instagram

Located about 25 kilometres (16 miles) past Sooke on the rugged southwest coast of Vancouver Island, Point-No-Point Resort is a great place to unplug. The 25 cabins overlook the ocean and come equipped with kitchens and fireplaces—and no Wi-Fi. (Head to the main reception area if you need to get connected.)

If you don’t feel like cooking, wander over to the restaurant, which has fantastic ocean views. Binoculars assist in spotting wildlife on the shores below.

Tigh-Na-Mara Seaside Resort and Conference Centre, Parksville

A secluded log cabin surrounded by trees.

Tigh-Na-Mara resort in Parksville offers luxurious log cabins with jetted tubs that are steps away from the resort’s spa. Photo: Tigh-Na-Mara

This Parksville, Vancouver Island resort is a good place to go if you’re looking for pampering. There are a wide variety of accommodation options, including pet-friendly rustic log cottages with wood-burning fireplaces.

Also crafted from logs, the spa bungalows are nicely furnished with comfortable sofas and jetted tubs. These range in size from studios to two-bedroom cabins, and are located near the resort’s Grotto Spa, with its warm mineral pool. You can even dine in your bathrobe at the spa’s tapas restaurant, or head over to the Cedars Restaurant & Lounge.

The property fronts three kilometres of sandy beach, great for long, contemplative walks.

For more cosy cabin ideas, see the Backcountry Lodges of British Columbia Association and HelloBC.com.